Sidebar

AGM & Pot-Luck Dinner Well Attended

 
Pot Luck Dinners always seem to draw out the membership and this years AGM & Pot Luck was no exception with well over 60 members attending. As usual Martha Jenkins assembled her team of volunteers and they layer out a sumptuous meal that included Turkey, Ham, and dozens of homemade recipes and desserts brought in by the members. I don’t think anyone went home hungry.
 
A Great Big THANK-YOU goes out to all who contributed food and time to this event. As they say, many hands make for light work!
 
The evening got underway with a great meal ad was followed throughout the evening with elections of the Executive for the 2011-2012 term. Your new executive for the coming year are as follows:

  • President:  Jon Koehle
  • 1st Vice President:  Brent Tingstad
  • 2nd Vice President:  William Schoof
  • Secrtetary:  Jolinda Froehlich
  • Treasurer:  Gordon Wilson
  • Director:  Judie Vergnano

 
Thank you to everyone who ran for the Executive and congratulations to those elected.
 

Following the election Lorne Davies gave a report on the Ecosystem Restoration work the club is proposing on the Bear Creek Bald Range and Gord Wilson gave a presentation on the new Website the club has recently launched.
 
President John Koehle also made trophy award presentation to members. Congratulations to the following:

     

  • Mark Scheid:  Best Mule Deer
  • Jordan Bosch:  Best Whitetail
  • Chad Bosch:  Best Perch
  • Judie Vergnano:  Best Photo
  • Madelein Hannah:  Sportsman of the Year

 
The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 PM
 

Posted in PSA News | Tagged , | Comments closed

Hunting For Dinner

 

Download the PDF

Back to list

Details of Hunting For Dinner
Recipe / Item

Hunting for Dinner …by Judie Steeves

Whether you hunt through the meat section of the supermarket or butcher shop, your own fridge or freezer, or in the wild for your meat, it’s vital that you prepare and cook it right to prevent toughening or drying it out.
Particular care needs to be paid to cooking game meats as there’s little of the extra fat we’ve bred into domestic animals.
When we lived in wilderness in the Cariboo our nearest ranch neighbours were miles away, while our closest were the grouse who competed with our domestic chickens for the bugs in my garden; the moose who chewed on willow twigs in winter and spring, and aquatic plants in the pond in our front yard in summer and fall; the beaver who dammed our creek so it created the pond the moose loved; bears who would compete with us for summer patches of wild dwarf blueberries; the porcupine the dogs chased up a tree; shy rabbits whose presence became obvious as soon as it snowed; and delicate deer who nibbled my lettuce before I did.
It was a love-hate relationship with many of them, just as it often is with siblings or neighbours you have to live with and put up with their annoying foibles.
Come fall, we all began to prepare for the long winter which loomed ahead, and which could mean life or death, depending on our preparations.
The rabbits changed colour, in order to blend in better with their surroundings, the moose grew a thicker coat of fur, ducks and geese headed south, bears ate heartily in preparation for hibernation, squirrels hoarded pine cones, and we slaughtered our pigs, insulated the chicken coop, and hunted for game to put in the freezer.
Whether it’s a breast of grouse, pheasant or other game bird, a haunch of venison, moose or bear, care must be taken not to overcook the meat or it will resemble shoe leather.
Instead use recipes that call for liquid in cooking, whether that be wine or beer, a sauce, water, broth or stock, or juicy vegetables or fruit such as tomatoes; whether a few tablespoons or a few cups.
Consider marinating the meat overnight with a meat-tenderizing agent. Try fermented liquids such as alcohols, vinegars, or soy sauce, or acids such as lemon or other citrus juice, tomatoes or vinegars.

Grilled Game Kabobs
The piece of bacon wrapped around each square of meat adds flavour, but also keeps the meat moist. You may substitute beef.

1 lb. tenderloin squares 454 g
l/2 lb. bacon 225 g
cherry tomatoes
onion squares
green pepper squares

You could use tougher cuts of meat by marinating it first as suggested above, then treat it as you would tenderloin. Even domestic tenderloin has a tendency to be dry, so would benefit from being cooked in this way.
Cut meat into one-inch squares and wrap each in a thin piece of bacon, using as little as needed just to wrap each piece of meat.
Alternate meat pieces with vegetable squares and cook over a hot fire until the bacon has crisped, moving the skewers about when flare-ups occur.
You must pay attention to these as they cook or you’ll end up with charred bits of inedible leather.
This makes a simple camping meal as there are no dishes involved.
To take that one step further, remove kabob contents directly into a half pita bread, opened up and spread with yogurt, sour cream, mayonnaise or barbecue sauce, so dinner can be eaten in the hand. No clean-up at all.
Serves 2-4, more as an appetizer.

Grouse with Grapes
The moisture from the grapes and wine keeps the delicate breast meat moist and flavourful.
If you don’t have a grouse breast, use whatever other poultry is available.

2 grouse breasts 2
1 onion 1
1 c. grapes 250 ml
1/2 c.white wine 125 ml
2 tsp. tarragon 10 ml
2 tsp. parsley 10 ml
1/2 tsp. salt 2 ml
1/4 tsp. pepper 1 ml

Soften a chopped onion in a dribble of oil in a non-stick pan over medium-high heat.
Push them to the side and brown the breasts on both sides.
Add dry white wine, grapes, fresh herbs and salt and pepper.
Cover and simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes until breast is cooked through but some liquid remains.
Serve over brown rice.
Serves 2.

Corned Meat
This is delicious.

5 lb. meat 2.3 kg
4 qt. cold water 4 l
2 c. pickling salt 50 ml
1/2 c. brown sugar 125 ml
2 tbsp. pickling spices 30 ml
10 black peppercorns 10
10 bay leaves 10
5 cloves garlic 5 cloves

Brisket is a cheap cut of beef that’s most commonly corned. It’s excellent used for this, as is moose, venison or bear.
Combine cold water, coarse picking salt, dark brown sugar, whole pickling spices and peppercorns in a large pot and boil for 10 minutes or so.
Cool down completely before adding peeled garlic cloves and pouring over meat in a large glass jar or bowl, enameled casserole or stoneware crock.
Weigh it down with a plate holding a bowl or jar of water or sand so the meat is completely immersed in the liquid.
Cover and store in a cool place for two weeks.
Use meat immediately in a boiled dinner.

Corned Beef or Venison Dinner
This is traditionally served with wedges of steamed cabbage, boiled potatoes and other root vegetables.

5 lb. corned meat 2.3 kg
2 onions 2
2 celery stalks 2
5 peppercorns 5
1 bay leaf 1

Pre-heat oven to 350F.
Remove meat from brine and wash it well to remove excess salt and spices, and discard brine. The home-corned meat will have turned brown because no sodium nitrate was used to keep its red colour.
Place in a large Dutch oven and add cold water to cover.
To reduce the saltiness of the meat, simmer it first for 10-15 minutes, then drain the water off and refill.
This time add chopped onions, celery, cracked black peppercorns and bay leaf.
Cover and cook in the oven until tender, about 3 hours.
Remove and slice.
Leftovers make great sandwich meat.
Serves 6-8.

Posted in Food & Drink | Tagged | Comments closed

Kokanee Fishing Open On Okanagan Lake

 
The Kokanee fishery on Okanagan Lake was officially open as of April 1st of this year with a limit of five (5) fish per day per angler. Paul Askey, Ministry Biologist with the Fish & Wildlife Section provides a complete report on the status of the Kokanee fishery in Okanagan Lake. Read Paul’s Report here
 

Posted in PSA Executive | Comments closed

C.O.R.E. Program

Details of C.O.R.E. Program
C.O.R.E. Program
Information
The Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education (CORE) Program is British Columbia’s Hunter Education Program. It is also a great program for anyone interested in outdoor recreation.
  
The CORE Program consists of a practical firearms handling test, and a written examination on all of the following subjects:
 
• Conservation
• Ethics
• Law and Regulations
• First Aid and Survival
• Firearm Safety
• Animal Identification
• Bird Identification
 
The CORE Manual and the Hunting and Trapping Regulation Synopsis are the resource manuals used to learn these subjects.
 
BC Residents who are 14 years of age or older and who wish to obtain a hunting licence are required to complete the CORE Program.
 
The goal of the CORE Program is to ensure that prospective hunters meet acceptable standards of knowledge and skill for safe and ethical participation in hunting recreation.
 
The Hunter Safety Training Regulation prescribes the required fees for the CORE Program is $10 for each test and $30 for the graduate certificate.
 
Individuals who have completed a hunter education program from another state or province in North America are exempt from the requirement to complete the CORE Program. Contact the Government Agent at BC Access Centres for more details on program exemption.

The Peachland Sportsmen’s Association facilitates C.O.R.E. courses two or three times per year. Upcoming course dates will be published on the Blog and also noted in the Event Calendar once the dates are known. Keep checking back with the PSA website for more news on the C.O.R.E. Program.
 

Click to Become a Member
peachlandsportsmens.ca/membership
Posted in C.O.R.E. | Tagged | Comments closed

Initiation Hunting Licence and requirements for an accompanying hunter

 

Initiation Hunting Licence and requirements for an accompanying hunter

 
Current Regulations:
A BC resident who is 18 years of age or older and wants to hunt is currently required to successfully complete a hunter safety training course approved by the Director before being eligible to obtain a hunter number and hunting licence in B.C.
 
Proposed Regulations:
Background on the Proposed Regulation:
Government has approved amendments to the Wildlife Act to allow B.C. residents 18 years of age or older to try hunting without having to take hunter safety training provided they hold an Initiation Hunting Licence and are accompanied by a licensed hunter over the age of 18 who meets the requirements.
 
Initiation Hunting Licence

An Initiation Hunting Licence is available only once in a lifetime to a person 18 years of age or older to try hunting without having to first successfully pass a hunter safety training course.
 

An Initiation Hunting Licence fee is proposed to fall somewhere between the cost of a youth licence ($7.00) and the cost of a basic hunting licence ($32.00).
 
An Initiation Hunting Licence authorizes the licence holder to hunt during General Open Seasons only.

 
Bag Limit

Under an Initiation Hunting Licence, any game taken by the licence holder is included in the bag limit of the accompanying hunter.
 
Below is the current definition of “accompany”. This definition is not proposed to change.
“accompany” means to remain in the company of the other person, able to see the other person without the aid of any device other than ordinary corrective lenses and able to communicate by unamplified voice with that person;
 
Contents of the Proposed Regulation:

Bring provisions into force
This proposal will allow anyone 18 years of age or older who has never hunted, who hunted as a youth under 18 years of age, or who would never have tried hunting, to hunt under the close supervision of a licensed adult hunter without having to first successfully pass a hunter safety training course.

Accompanying Hunter
As part of bringing the new Initiation Hunting Licence into effect, government is considering establishing requirements for the accompanying hunter as follows:

The accompanying hunter must be 18 years of age or older.

The accompanying hunter may accompany no more than two initiation licensed hunters at one time (The accompanying hunter may accompany no more than two initiation licence holders and/or youths at one time (i.e. 2 initiation licence holders or 2 youth or 1 initiation licence holder and 1 youth).

The accompanying hunter must have (a) held a British Columbia resident hunting licence and a big game species licence for three of the previous five licence years immediately preceding the licence year in which the person accompanies an initiation licensed hunter, or (b)successfully completed CORE, and held a British Columbia resident hunting licence and a big game species licence for two of the five previous licence years immediately preceding the licence year in which the person accompanies an initiation licensed hunter.

If the accompanying hunter has been convicted within the previous five years of an offence under the Wildlife Actor regulations made under the Act, or the Firearm Act, they may be ineligible to accompany an initiation licensed hunter.

Rationale:
This change gives people an opportunity to find out if they enjoy hunting and to begin the social and participatory process of actually becoming a hunter before requiring them to go through the time and monetary commitment of taking hunter safety training.

The new licence increases recreational opportunities for youth and families to hunt in B.C. and supports hunter recruitment and retention in general.

The proposed qualifications for who accompanies (mentors) an initiation licensed hunter and under what conditions they do so will help ensure hunter safety by requiring demonstrated and advanced level of knowledge and experience related to hunting. Also, the requirements provide greater consistency with requirements of other accompanying hunters, such as for a permit to accompany non-resident hunters or as an accompanying hunter for youth for Waterfowler Heritage Days.

Additional Information:
See Questions and Answers click here

Note that hunting licence regulations for B.C. residents under 18 years of age are also proposed to be amended. Review the AHTE proposal titled “ Expanded Youth Hunting Licence (formerly Junior Hunting Licence)” for more information.
 

Posted in Firearms, Hunting & Fishing, PSA News | Tagged | Comments closed

Proposed New Youth Hunting Regulation

 

(Proposed) Requirements for the accompanying hunter of licensed youth hunter.

 
Current Regulations:
Currently, a parent or guardian applies for and holds a junior hunting licence on behalf of a youth aged 10 – 13. At age 14, youth are required to successfully complete a hunter safety course approved by the Director prior to being able to obtain their own hunter number and hunting licence and subsequently hunt in B.C. In B.C., the hunter safety course is Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education (CORE).

 

B.C. requires that all youth under the age of 18 must be accompanied and closely supervised by a licensed adult hunter. A written undertaking of a parent or guardian that the youth will not hunt or carry a firearm unless the youth is accompanied by and under the close personal supervision of a licensed adult person (age 18 or older) is also required. This written undertaking is called an “Acknowledgement of Responsibility”.

 

Proposed Regulations:
 
Background on the Proposed Regulation:
Government has approved amendments to the Wildlife Act that will expand the age range for which a parent or guardian can obtain a youth hunting licence on behalf of a youth from the current 10- 13 years of age to the new range of 10 – 17 years of age.

 

Hunter Safety Training

Successful completion of CORE will not be mandatory until age 18.
At any time, a youth age 10 – 17 will be able to take CORE and get their own hunter number, hunting licence and bag limit.
 

Bag Limit

Under a youth licence, any game taken by the youth is included in the bag limit of the accompanying hunter.
 

Acknowledgement of Responsibility
There are no changes to the requirement for a parent or guardian to sign an Acknowledgement of Responsibility for a youth.
There is no change to the requirement for a youth to be accompanied by a licensed adult.
 

Youth Hunting Licence
The cost for a youth hunting licence remains at $7.00.
All youth under the age of 18 must be accompanied and closely supervised by a person 18 years of age or older and who holds or is exempt from holding a hunting licence.
Below is the current definition of “accompany”. This definition is not proposed to change.

“accompany” means to remain in the company of the other person, able to see the other person without the aid of any device other than ordinary corrective lenses and able to communicate by unamplified voice with that person;
 

Contents of the Proposed Regulation:
 

Bring provisions into force
The proposed regulation would bring recent amendments to the Wildlife Act into force which will allow 14 – 17 year olds who have never tried hunting, or who hunted as a junior under 14 years of age, to hunt under the close supervision of a licensed adult hunter without having to first successfully complete a hunter safety training course.

 

Accompanying Hunter
As part of bringing the expanded youth licence into effect, government is considering establishing requirements for the accompanying hunter as follows:

The accompanying hunter may accompany no more than two youths at one time (The accompanying hunter may accompany no more than two youths and/or initiation licence holders at one time (i.e. 2 youth or 2 initiation licence holders or 1 youth and 1 initiation licence holder).
The accompanying hunter must have (a) held a British Columbia resident hunting licence and a big game species licence for three of the previous five licence years immediately preceding the licence year in which the person accompanies an youth hunter, or (b) successfully completed CORE, and held a British Columbia resident hunting licence and a big game species licence for two of the five previous licence years immediately preceding the licence year in which the person accompanies an youth hunter.
If the accompanying hunter has been convicted within the previous five years of an offence under the Wildlife Act or regulations made under the Act, or the Firearm Act,they may be ineligible to accompany a youth licensed hunter.
 

Rationale:
The expanded age range for youth licences increases recreational opportunities for youth and families to hunt in BC and supports hunter recruitment and retention in general.

 

The proposed qualifications for who accompanies (mentors) a youth hunter and under what conditions they do so will help ensure hunter safety by requiring a demonstrated and advanced level of knowledge and experience related to hunting. Also, the requirements provide greater consistency with requirements of other accompanying hunters – such as for a permit to accompany non-resident hunters or as an accompanying hunter for youth for Waterfowler Heritage Days.

 

Additional Information:
See Questions and Answers click here
 

Note: A new Initiation Hunting Licence is being proposed to allow B.C. residents 18 years of age or older who have never held a B.C. Hunting licence to try hunting, while being accompanied by a licensed adult resident hunter, without having to successfully complete a hunter safety training course. Review the AHTE proposal titled “Initiation Hunting Licence” for more information.
 

Posted in Firearms, Hunting & Fishing, PSA News | Tagged | Comments closed

Bill C-19 – Ending the Long Gun Registry Act

Click here to download the Special Bulletin for Businesses issued by the RCMP that outlines the Implementation of Bill C-19, the Ending of the Long Gun Registry Act.

 

At Long Last!

 

Click Here to Become a PSA Member

 

Posted in Firearms | Tagged | Comments closed

LEH Now Online

The 2012/2013 Limited Entry Hunting Regulations Synopsis is now available online.The hard copy synopsis is currently being printed and should be available at your local vendor by May 1, 2012.

 

 

Please Note: The deadline for applications is May 25, 2012

 
Click Here to Become a PSA Member
 

Posted in Hunting & Fishing, PSA News | Tagged , | Comments closed

Welcome To The PSA’s New Website

After many months of development our new website is finally up and running. We should have the Pay Pal system completed and operating by April 16th so you will be able to join or renew your memberships online by completing the form and clicking the PayPal button. This will be totally functional by the 16th of April. For those of you who would rather mail your memberships, select the DOWNLOAD Category in the drop down list and you can download a fillable form to complete and mail in with your cheque.

 

Enjoy the website and provide is with some feedback!
 
If you are not a member yet, consider joining. Click Here to Become a PSA Member
 

Posted in PSA News | Comments closed

Jude’s Kitchen Nominated for Taste Canada Food Writing Award

Judie Steeves cookbook Jude’s Kitchen has been nominated in the Regional Cookbook  category at Taste Canada.. The Food Writing Awards. Judie, a long time member of The Peachland Sportsmen’s Association was “delighted it’s been nominated” she added the cookbook is up against the likes of Canadian Living, Roger Mooking and David Rocco as well as seven others.

 

Congratulations Judie and we wish you the best of luck in the competition.

 

Posted in PSA News | Tagged , | Comments closed